Bird Habitats – Birdlife Med http://birdlifemed.org/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 21:48:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Collared pheasants were transplanted to Idaho over 100 years ago and are a prized game bird http://birdlifemed.org/collared-pheasants-were-transplanted-to-idaho-over-100-years-ago-and-are-a-prized-game-bird/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 20:56:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/collared-pheasants-were-transplanted-to-idaho-over-100-years-ago-and-are-a-prized-game-bird/ If you want to try pheasant hunting, the youth seasons for licensed hunters 17 and under run from October 2-8. Young people must be accompanied by an adult 18 years or older. Adult seasons vary across the state depending on the region and whether the hunter is a resident or a non-resident. Check the Highland […]]]>

If you want to try pheasant hunting, the youth seasons for licensed hunters 17 and under run from October 2-8. Young people must be accompanied by an adult 18 years or older. Adult seasons vary across the state depending on the region and whether the hunter is a resident or a non-resident. Check the Highland Game, Turkey, and Furbearers Seasons and Rules Booklet for more information on pheasant seasons.

Collared pheasants were first introduced to Oregon from China in 1881. Since then, pheasants have been introduced across the country. These prized game birds are a treat to hunt and eat. To be successful in hunting, you need to know the habitat and behavior of your prey. Let’s take a look at this fall hunting staple. In Idaho, collar pheasants are widely distributed in agricultural areas mixed with taller vegetation. Look for them along rural roads, overgrown and recently harvested fields, brushy areas and rows of fences. Pheasants can be found along the Snake River Plain from the Oregon border to central Idaho.

They occur in lower densities in agricultural habitats below 5,000 feet in eastern Idaho and below 4,000 feet in northern Idaho, from Benewah County south to Whitebird . The highest pheasant harvest usually occurs in the Southwest, Magic Valley, and Southeast regions. Some of the best hunts are found off the beaten path and on private land where most of the best habitat is found. Hunters willing to walk and knock on doors can be successful.

An important habitat requirement for pheasants is dense cover. The nesting blanket should be at least 18 inches high. The nest is a shallow depression made by the female. Usually 10 to 12 eggs are laid, but sometimes two hens use the same nest. This can increase the number of eggs found in a nest to 23. In about 24 days the eggs will hatch.

The young are precocious, which means that they are able to walk and find food on their own right after hatching. A permanent cover that provides protection from winter weather is also important. Winter shelters can be found in bushes and trees along streams, windbreaks and fences.

Pheasants need plenty of food and water. They feed on the ground on cereals, seeds and insects. A good place to look for pheasants are fields harvested with corn, wheat and barley scraps.

Pheasants usually walk or run. They fly when disturbed at close range. Strong breast muscles provide bursts of power. Pheasants are capable of a breathtaking flush. They launch themselves almost vertically at speeds close to 40 miles per hour. The launch is impressive, but they cannot fly great distances. Pheasants generally do not cover more than 200 meters in a single flight. Hunters with a good pointing dog or those who are quick at the draw will have the greatest success in getting a shot.


Source link

]]>
Get outside! and go bird watching in Vernon – Vernon Morning Star http://birdlifemed.org/get-outside-and-go-bird-watching-in-vernon-vernon-morning-star/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 18:00:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/get-outside-and-go-bird-watching-in-vernon-vernon-morning-star/ Have you ever been to Swan Lake Nature Reserve Park? Swan Lake is one of the most important areas for waterfowl in southern British Columbia and is a critical stop on a flyway. With fall fast approaching, this is a wonderful park for viewing remarkably rare birds in the Okanagan like American white pelicans and […]]]>

Have you ever been to Swan Lake Nature Reserve Park?

Swan Lake is one of the most important areas for waterfowl in southern British Columbia and is a critical stop on a flyway.

With fall fast approaching, this is a wonderful park for viewing remarkably rare birds in the Okanagan like American white pelicans and trumpeter swans that migrate through.

Stay tuned to the North Okanagan Naturalist Club Facebook site for their arrival updates and bring your binoculars and enjoy!

This is a unique and exceptional bird sanctuary and wildlife reserve, not a dog walking park. Dogs are not allowed! So take Fido somewhere else for a getaway.

This valley-bottom park surrounds the southern end of Swan Lake with rolling pastoral meadows flanked by wooded hills and a dramatic sweeping landscape of meadow-style blue skies above.

It is 360 degrees of breathtaking panoramic landscapes.

Some of the best bird sightings in British Columbia can be found here, by the lake and surrounding wetlands.

It is a breeding, nesting and migration refuge for ducks, waterfowl, marsh birds and more.

Rolling grasslands that rise from wetlands create rich habitats for even more wildlife, including amphibians, reptiles and small mammals.

Raptors (birds of prey) frequently hunt here.

And our great blue herons, which nest in the last group of tall, old poplars in the commercial area of ​​Vernon, hunt snakes, frogs, fish and insects at Swan Lake. You can spot their massive nests, especially during the winter and spring without leaves. So raise your eyes and look around when you are here.

The North Okanagan Naturalist Club (NONC) recently kindly built an impressive lookout tower along the trail. Interpretive panels inside help identify your sightings. Three interpretive panels, also along the gentle two-kilometer loop, describe the fauna and ecology and tell the story of the territory.

The lake itself, and the shoreline to the high water mark, is a provincial wildlife management area because of its importance to migratory and nesting birds. The marsh is owned by Ducks Unlimited Canada. RDNO manages the entire property and NONC is a steward. NONC members are involved in the preservation and restoration of this precious lake and marsh area.

To get there, head north on Old Kamloops Road. Approximately 2.3 kilometers from the intersection of 43rd Avenue and Alexis Park Drive, turn right at the Swan Lake Regional Park sign at Stawn’s Honey, then follow the gravel road for 0.7 km to parking lot at the start of the trail.

Visit nonc.ca, then choose natural sites for a great photo of the new observation tower and a list of other great natural sites around Vernon. Enjoy!

PS – Look to see who wrote and designed the signs.

Roseanne Van Ee enthusiastically shares her knowledge of the outdoors to help readers discover and enjoy nature. Discover exciting and adventurous natural events, the best trails and wild places. Follow her on facebook.

Column


Source link

]]>
Say hello to the standing spotted skunks, “the acrobats of the skunk world” http://birdlifemed.org/say-hello-to-the-standing-spotted-skunks-the-acrobats-of-the-skunk-world/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 22:26:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/say-hello-to-the-standing-spotted-skunks-the-acrobats-of-the-skunk-world/ Originally Posted: 01 SEP 21 06:33 ET Update: Sept. 21, 21 at 5:49 p.m. ET By Ashley Strickland, CNN (CNN) – At first glance, you might think all skunks are the same. Not so. Meet the spotted skunks, “the acrobats of the skunk world”. Scientists have found that there are more of these species than […]]]>

Originally Posted: 01 SEP 21 06:33 ET

Update: Sept. 21, 21 at 5:49 p.m. ET

By Ashley Strickland, CNN

(CNN) – At first glance, you might think all skunks are the same. Not so.

Meet the spotted skunks, “the acrobats of the skunk world”. Scientists have found that there are more of these species than they thought, new research shows.

More recently, the number agreed upon was four. But a new study published Wednesday in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution indicates that there are seven species of spotted skunks.

“North America is one of the most studied continents in terms of mammals, and carnivores are one of the most studied groups,” said study author Adam Ferguson, head of collections at Negaunee mammals at the Field Museum in Chicago. “Everyone thinks we know all about the systematics of mammalian carnivores, so being able to redraw the skunk family tree is very exciting.”

Spotted skunks are the smallest relatives of the common striped skunk. The size of a squirrel, these elusive carnivores live across North America. And when the time comes to scare off a predator, these little guys do a headstand and stick their hind legs out.

“When they’re stressed, they bounce off their forelimbs, then hit their hindlimbs, swell their tails, and they can actually walk towards the predator, as if to make them look bigger and scarier,” Fergusons said.

Skunks usually get on all fours in order to aim deadly and control their foul-smelling spray. Their small size also does not cause these creatures to recoil in combat.

A study published in 2013 included a video of a western spotted skunk standing and facing a mountain lion on a deer carcass. For reference, spotted skunks typically weigh less than 2 pounds (0.9 kilograms).

It’s just another example of their daring, something he admires in skunks in general, Ferguson said.

While the common striped skunk has made its presence known in urban areas, as well as its natural habitats, striped skunks have not made the same inroads and therefore remain largely out of sight. These “ecologically cryptic” creatures live in dense environments and remote areas and appear less adaptable to urbanization than their larger, striped counterparts, Ferguson said.

Given their agility, spotted skunks are great climbers, and they are much more carnivorous than other skunks, feasting on the eggs of birds, lizards, snakes, and rodents. The Great Horned Owls are their main predator.

The fact that spotted skunks are so good at keeping a low profile makes them more difficult to study. Since the discovery of the first spotted skunk in 1758, scientists have wondered how many species exist. Over the years, the differences seen between some spotted skunks have led researchers to believe that there were only two species and as many as 14.

Determining that there are seven species amounts to analyzing the genetic data of spotted skunks. But first, Ferguson needed specimens to study. Trapping skunks isn’t the easiest job – Ferguson and his colleagues made six trips to Mexico while looking for spotted skunks and never caught one. And if you catch one, you’re bound to be pulverized.

“We call it the Smell of Success because it means we’ve met one, which is the ultimate goal,” Ferguson said.

Ferguson was inspired to make “wanted” posters and distribute them throughout central Texas to food stores and areas where ranchers and trappers operate. The posters described the need for any spotted skunks that might have been trapped or found as killed on the road and showed photos of the creatures. The researchers offered to collect the skunk specimens and store them in a designated “skunk freezer”.

The researchers also drew on specimens from museum collections, which included spotted skunks found in Central America and Yucatan. Ultimately, they had 203 specimens of spotted skunk to use for the study and DNA extraction. Genetic data revealed that some of the skunks, once thought to be the same species, were actually quite different.

“I was able to extract DNA from samples from centuries-old museums, and it was really exciting to see who these individuals were related to. It turns out that one of them was a currently unrecognized endemic species. in Yucatan, ”the study said. author Molly McDonough, professor of biology at Chicago State University and research associate at Field Museum, in a statement.

One of the new species in the study is the Yucatan spotted skunk, which is about the size of a squirrel and is only found on the Yucatan Peninsula. Scientists also describe the plains spotted skunk, whose population has declined over the past century and has been suggested as an endangered species.

“The study wouldn’t have been possible without the museum specimens we had,” Ferguson said. “The only reason we were able to get footage from Yucatan was museum specimens that were collected 60 or 70 years ago.”

Understanding the different species of skunks can help scientists learn about something unique to these creatures: their reproductive biology. Spotted skunks can breed in the fall, but they do not give birth until the spring. In other words, their reproductive system deliberately delays the implantation of the egg in the uterus.

“He’s hanging around for a while,” Ferguson said. “We want to know why some species have delayed establishment and others not, and understanding how these different species of skunks evolved can help us do that.”

Skunks have come a long way since their first appearance in the fossil record 25 million years ago, evolving and separating into different species in response to climate change caused by the Ice Age.

Learning more about spotted skunks can also help conservation efforts to protect these animals. Skunks have their own role to play in the ecosystem, consuming fruit and defecating seeds that aid in plant dispersal, as well as attacking crop pests and rodents, Ferguson said.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.


Source link

]]>
Migratory birds have found refuge in Pangasinan http://birdlifemed.org/migratory-birds-have-found-refuge-in-pangasinan/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 21:00:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/migratory-birds-have-found-refuge-in-pangasinan/ FEEDING TIME In this file photo, workers continue to clean a fish pond in Binmaley, Pangasinan province, after a harvest of ‘bangus’ (milkfish) as flocks of migrating birds and locals feed on whatever is left on the pond beds. More than a dozen sites in the Pangasinan are home to migratory birds. — WILLIE LOMIBAO […]]]>

FEEDING TIME In this file photo, workers continue to clean a fish pond in Binmaley, Pangasinan province, after a harvest of ‘bangus’ (milkfish) as flocks of migrating birds and locals feed on whatever is left on the pond beds. More than a dozen sites in the Pangasinan are home to migratory birds. — WILLIE LOMIBAO

BINMALEY, Pangasinan, Philippines – There is more to this city than its famous ‘bangus’ (milkfish) and tilapia.

As soon as the harvest season is over, hundreds of birds, mostly egrets, take over and invade the city’s fish ponds in search of what remains in the dry areas.

The view never fails to delight travelers along the highway that crosses the vast Binmaley marshes, especially in the village of Biec, which has been officially recognized as an important wetland by Wetlands International, a non-profit organization. lucrative dedicated to the conservation and restoration of the world’s wetlands.

Most of the birds seen here are migratory species, but the egrets, notable for their slender, long legs and long black beaks, have been observed to stay longer, said Maria Angelica Esteban, a member of staff at the Community Office of the environment and natural resources (Cenro) at Pangasinan power station.

According to Esteban, egrets seem to have taken up residence in the wetlands and mangrove forests of Pangasinan, as they are seen in these areas all year round. In fact, the residents gave them a local name – “dulakak”.

Esteban’s office conducts the annual count of migratory and local birds in Binmaley for the Asian Waterbird Census (AWC) every year in January.

She said the birds only come from September to February to escape the winter months in Japan and China, and seek out the warm temperatures of wetlands and farmlands in the Philippines, which provide them with abundant food.

Migration model

But climate change appears to have affected the migration pattern of birds.

“Years ago they started arriving in August, but now they come here in September or even the end of October,” she told the Inquirer.

The Pangasinan wetlands support migratory birds in more than a dozen sites: three in the town of Alaminos, four in Bolinao, two in Infanta and one each in the towns of Burgos, Dasol, Sual and Bani.

The Bangrin mangrove forest in Bani covers only 44 hectares, but flocks of birds of different species stay there for months every year.

Last January, a count made by Cenro in Alaminos City recorded 32,260 birds belonging to 13 species in Bangrin.

These included 44 Philippine ducks (Anas luzonica), which is endemic to the Philippines. Eleven Philippine ducks were also observed in the 200 ha Lambes-Zaragoza wetland in Bolinao.

With the exception of the Philippine duck which is classified as “vulnerable”, all other birds are listed as “Least Concern” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature on the Red List of Threatened Species.

The intermediate egrets dominate the mangrove forest of Bangrin, numbering 16,023, followed by little egrets (10,232) and great egrets (5,085).

VALUABLE RESOURCE Residents of Bani, Pangasinan, protect their mangroves as they serve as breeding and nesting grounds for both marine species and birds. —PHOTOS BY EV ESPIRITU AND CENRO CENTRAL PANGASINAN

Protected area

The forest, accessible by boat, is a protected area created in 1990 by the late mayor of the city, Marcelo Navarro Sr. The book “Bird Watching in the Philippines” ranks it as one of the 13 best birding sites from the country. .

But since the pandemic struck last year, no bird watcher has visited the area, said Romel Dulay, the municipal tourism officer.

Visitors to the forest should strictly follow the rules to avoid disturbing the birds, especially the nesting ones. Silence is required while walking a footbridge that winds around the forest.

“They (visitors) cannot use the radio or other sound equipment, or play loud music, inside the forest. Even boatmen should turn off their engines when they are nearby and should only paddle towards the mooring area, ”said Dulay.

The local government has also banned the use of firecrackers by owners and operators of fish ponds to scare off birds, which feed on fry.

“The owners of the ponds simply hang colorful fabrics around the ponds, as the birds would be opposed to the colors, to drive them away,” he said.

But the birds in the Bangrin protected area are lucky. “As the place is remote from the communities and the local government strictly enforces the laws to protect them, they can exist peacefully and feed themselves in the area,” Dulay said.

Threats

It’s a different story for the birds of the Biec wetlands in Binmaley.

According to Esteban, urbanization is closing in on their habitats which are transformed into commercial zones. Commercial establishments, restaurants and other structures are rapidly expanding into private properties where fish ponds once operated.

“We cannot stop the development on private properties but we can no longer watch the birds in the usual sites,” she said.

Despite the loss of some of their habitats, more birds were counted in AWC 2021 compared to AWC 2020 in the Biec wetland, according to a report from Cenro.

In 2020, a total of 1,120 birds were seen at the site, increasing to 1,727 birds in this year’s count. However, there have been fewer species recorded this year, according to the report.

Herons, barn swallows and brown shrikes are missing this year, according to the report. However, another type of bird that we had not seen in previous years, the green shank, came to take shelter.

But Esteban, who helped prepare the report, speculated that some birds may have been “missing” during the viewing day only, as they could have arrived in the country but were in other areas when the census was taken.

She admitted that the AWC results might not give an exact number, especially since this year it was only conducted for one day and not the usual three days in the past.

But the egrets remained in great numbers – about 500 each of intermediate egrets and great egrets, and 50 little egrets.

At Bued Mangrove Forest Park in Alaminos City, egrets have also appeared in large numbers. The last census counted 1,545 little egrets, 440 intermediate egrets and 35 great egrets.

Preserving wetlands

Like the mangrove forest of Bani, the artificial forest of Bued, in the town of Alaminos, welcomes bird watchers.

An information center features photographs of migrating birds on its wall and a viewing deck that was established years ago by the city government of Alaminos and Metro Pacific Investments Corp. as part of its corporate social responsibility.

The city government has set up an observation tower from where visitors can observe birds perched atop the mangroves.

In the wetlands managed by Cenro Alaminos, the number of birds has decreased slightly this year, although the pandemic has been an opportunity for birds to breed as they are not greatly affected by human activities.

According to Chester Casil, head of Cenro Alaminos, his agency regularly patrols and monitors coastal areas to protect wetlands and their annual “guests”.

In addition, Cenro has partnered with local governments and non-governmental organizations to protect wetlands through regular communication, education and public awareness campaigns.

Some residents are hired to serve as “bantay dagat” (maritime patrol) to monitor marine resources which serve as breeding, nesting and feeding grounds for birds, which are protected by Republic Law No. 9147 (Law of 2001 on the conservation and protection of wildlife resources). ).

Esteban said the migratory birds were a sight to behold and best enjoyed from afar. “After all, they are wild animals and they are afraid of humans and would fly away once you get close to them,” she said.

Read more

Don’t miss the latest news and information.

To subscribe to REQUEST MORE to access The Philippine Daily Inquirer and over 70 titles, share up to 5 gadgets, listen to the news, download from 4 a.m. and share articles on social media. Call 896 6000.



Source link

]]>
Beer giant Żubr to help Biebrza National Park buy land for conservation work – The First News http://birdlifemed.org/beer-giant-zubr-to-help-biebrza-national-park-buy-land-for-conservation-work-the-first-news/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 11:51:10 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/beer-giant-zubr-to-help-biebrza-national-park-buy-land-for-conservation-work-the-first-news/

The Żubr beer brand, named after one of Europe’s most endangered animals, the bison, has teamed up with the authorities of Biebrza National Park in a long-term cooperation project aimed at to recover critical land plots for endangered animal species.
Funduszzubra

A Polish beer brand has partnered with Poland’s largest national park to help protect endangered species by helping buy land for the park to carry out conservation work.

The Żubr beer brand, named after one of Europe’s most endangered animals, the bison, has teamed up with the authorities of Biebrza National Park in a long-term cooperation project aimed at to recover critical land plots for endangered animal species.

About 40 percent of the land in the Pak is not owned by him, but privately owned, meaning park staff cannot carry out conservation activities there.

Activities in Biebrza National Park are part of the beer brand’s mission to support wildlife by reinvesting part of its profits into nature conservation.ubr

Important natural area on the map of Europe, Biebrza National Park contains one of the last valleys in Europe not destroyed by man and appreturn about 500 million cubic meters of water to the Biebrza wetlands, which are also home to several species of protected birds in Europe.

Włodzimierz Wróblewski, Deputy Director of Biebrza National Park said: “Habitat protection is the most effective measure for nature, not species protection.

“Habitat protection is essential for an endangered bird species to stay in the given area. Because it not only nests there, but also feeds there, brings its chicks to the water and rests during migration.

Urszula Czerniawska-Kapeluch, Senior Brand Manager at Żubr, said: “As our brand is inspired by the Polish nature world, we feel responsible for actively supporting its protection.Urszula Czerniawska-Kapeluch / Linkedin

“While agriculture is not an appropriate protection of these habitats, namely proper disbudding, mowing, etc.

“This will only be possible if we acquire this land for the park and protect it properly.”

The purchase of land is a priority for Parc de la Biebrza and the involvement of the Żubr brand now makes it possible to accelerate its acceleration.

The purchase of land is a priority for Parc de la Biebrza and the involvement of the Żubr brand is now making it possible to accelerate.ubr

The brand has already helped the park purchase the first of the planned plots, helping to increase park ownership over the area.

Activities in Biebrza National Park are part of the beer brand’s mission to support wildlife by reinvesting part of its profits into nature conservation.

It is already engaged in nature conservation and long-term initiatives in other regions of Poland, such as cooperation with Białowieża National Park where in 2020 it funded specialized equipment for worth PLN 1 million, will provide an additional PLN 1 million this year for ongoing initiatives to conserve wildlife and provided immediate assistance during fires in the Biebrza Valley.

Marcin Onufryjuk / PAP

Biebrza National Park contains one of the last valleys in Europe not destroyed by man and around 500 million cubic meters of water in the Biebrza wetlands which are also home to several species of protected birds in Europe.Artur Reszko / PAP

Urszula Czerniawska-Kapeluch, Senior Brand Manager at Żubr, said: “The Żubr brand was created 18 years ago around the symbols of Polish nature.

“In the brand’s advertisements, the brand’s hero – Żubr (representative of the European bison) – plays the role of the guardian of the forest, who takes care of all its inhabitants.

“As our brand draws on the Polish nature world, we feel responsible for actively supporting its protection. ”


Source link

]]>
Wildlife Center of Virginia releases rehabilitated bald eagle | State and regional news http://birdlifemed.org/wildlife-center-of-virginia-releases-rehabilitated-bald-eagle-state-and-regional-news/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 23:00:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/wildlife-center-of-virginia-releases-rehabilitated-bald-eagle-state-and-regional-news/ Luckily for Bald Eagle # 21-0214, she was able to fully recover from her injuries. After being walked around and seen up close by all onlookers, Clark released her back into the wild to the applause of the participants. Dr Karra Pierce, director of veterinary services at the center, testified to the strength of the […]]]>

Luckily for Bald Eagle # 21-0214, she was able to fully recover from her injuries.

After being walked around and seen up close by all onlookers, Clark released her back into the wild to the applause of the participants.

Dr Karra Pierce, director of veterinary services at the center, testified to the strength of the team’s now released eagle.

Pierce, known as Dr Karra to the staff, said their guest really had to get over her injuries in rehab just to do what she did on Thursday.

“He had two fractures in his shoulder,” Pierce said. “These bones are the most critical bones for the push for flight. When he’s in a cage for two months with a wrap on that wing, you’re not using those muscles. You have to rebuild them all.

However, that is exactly what their bald eagle did, as it slowly but steadily regained its strength and endurance after months of exercise in the flight enclosure at the Wildlife Center.

For Alex Wehrung, the Wildlife Center’s outreach coordinator, the event could not have gone better.

“All wildlife is valuable, regardless of its size,” Wehrung said. “But for bald eagles in particular and most importantly, there is a level of adoration that people have for them because they are our national symbol. They are big, attractive, cool, powerful… so there is an added level of excitement for eagle releases.


Source link

]]>
The PI revises its overall plan to better meet the city’s development objectives http://birdlifemed.org/the-pi-revises-its-overall-plan-to-better-meet-the-citys-development-objectives/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 12:43:22 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/the-pi-revises-its-overall-plan-to-better-meet-the-citys-development-objectives/ The city of Presque Isle has taken steps to revise its comprehensive plan, which will set out the main development goals for the next decade. PRESQUE ISLE, Maine – The city of Presque Isle has taken steps to revise its comprehensive plan, which will set out key development goals for the next decade. Unlike plans […]]]>

The city of Presque Isle has taken steps to revise its comprehensive plan, which will set out the main development goals for the next decade.

PRESQUE ISLE, Maine – The city of Presque Isle has taken steps to revise its comprehensive plan, which will set out key development goals for the next decade.

Unlike plans which detail specific projects or initiatives, such as the $ 5.3 million downtown redevelopment plan, the global plan lists more general objectives which aim to guide municipal councilors in their reflection on future projects.

Currently, the Presque Isle Planning Board is working with Jay Kamm, senior planner at the Northern Maine Development Commission, to update the overall plan, which previously covered the decade 2007-2017.

“The overall plan is supposed to be updated every 10 years. The city revised its last compensation plan adopted in 2007, ”said Galen Weibley, Director of Economic and Community Development for Presque Isle.

Although the city submitted a revised comprehensive plan in 2019, it received suggestions for improvement from the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. After the start of the pandemic, the DACF experienced a delay in the available data the city could cite, which further delayed the plan, according to Weibley.

But now the city is actively working to get approval for the 269-page plan for the coming decade and has highlighted many areas for potential improvement.

For example, in a section titled “Forest and Agricultural Resources”, the Comprehensive Plan encourages the city to “include in any future land use ordinances a requirement that commercial or subdivision developments maintain areas with agricultural soils. first-rate as open spaces wherever possible. . “

Other general objectives of the plan include taking measures to protect natural resources, such as existing fish, waterfowl and bird habitats, upgrading the city’s septic systems and water treatment facilities, improvement of roads, affordable housing and continued investment in the districts of financing by raising taxes for the development of enterprises.

The comprehensive plan covers a city-wide vision of what the community would like to see over the next 10 years, ”Weibley said. “The city plans to tackle affordable housing and economic development, given the city’s desire to position the community for further growth in the future. “

The planning board recently met with Kamm to discuss potential changes to the plan and will review the proposed outcome document at their September meeting. Once the plan is approved, city council will hold a public meeting before proposing changes or giving approval. The final document will be submitted to the DACF for approval.

In addition to guiding councilors’ actions, the comprehensive plan gives the city better opportunities to secure state and federal funds for community projects, Weibley said.

“State agencies consider comprehensive plans when developing state infrastructure projects,” Weibley said. “Placing [the city’s] Goals in the plan and by holding public meetings, we initiate community discussions and create momentum for projects in the future.


Source link

]]>
Man from Ederney shares fears for local starlings http://birdlifemed.org/man-from-ederney-shares-fears-for-local-starlings/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 07:03:54 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/man-from-ederney-shares-fears-for-local-starlings/ A LOCAL bird lover has raised concerns about the small bird population in his area after six nests around his home were attacked by magpies, killing a number of starling chicks. Maurice McGrath, who lives on the outskirts of Ederney, has been providing habitat for small birds around his home for many years, but in […]]]>

A LOCAL bird lover has raised concerns about the small bird population in his area after six nests around his home were attacked by magpies, killing a number of starling chicks.

Maurice McGrath, who lives on the outskirts of Ederney, has been providing habitat for small birds around his home for many years, but in the past two years he has seen starling nests attacked by magpies.

“There were six starlings’ nests. I deliberately cut six squares out of the dashboard all around my bungalow here, so they can come in and nest.

“Two-inch squares to provide them with homes,” he said, noting that this is the same breed of starlings that have been nesting in the area for 50 years.

Maurice explained that the starlings started to nest in early May, but unfortunately the nests were attacked by magpies in mid-June, killing all the starling chicks.

This is the second year that the starling nests around his house have been attacked by magpies.

Commenting that the killing of starlings by magpies is very upsetting, Maurice explained that he has also noticed a decrease in the number of other small birds in his area.

“It’s devastating. I walk a lot with my dog, and I know the numbers very well [of small birds] are down.

“There wouldn’t be three swallows in the village of Ederney this year. I’ve always counted them. There were three areas around the village and there was a group of swallows every year, around 20 swallows.

“This year, I don’t see any in the village. The magpie population is increasing every year. Everywhere I go now, I see magpies, magpies, magpies, ”Maurice told this newspaper.

The impartial rapporteur contacted the RSPB, asking if they were aware that this situation was happening on a regular basis and what can be done to help prevent this.

A spokesperson for the RSPB replied: “It can be extremely upsetting to see one species attacking another species, especially if young birds are the prey. It is human nature to want to protect attacked birds. However, it is the ruthless side of the natural world that we share, and predation is a daily threat to all other species. ”

The RSPB spokesperson explained how all species around the world have developed defenses and strategies to deal with predation.

“The magpie is one of the UK’s native predators, and any birds you will see in the garden have evolved with magpie predation as well. None of the evidence we have seen suggests that magpie is the cause of songbird decline. They occupy a niche as a natural predator, which all food chains need, ”said the RSPB spokesperson.


Source link

]]>
Restoration of the Anacostia watershed off Highway 1 to begin in 2022 http://birdlifemed.org/restoration-of-the-anacostia-watershed-off-highway-1-to-begin-in-2022/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 16:16:04 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/restoration-of-the-anacostia-watershed-off-highway-1-to-begin-in-2022/ Several streams and streams improvement projects in the Route 1 corridor will begin in 2022. the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signed an agreement with the Prince George County Department of the Environment begin to restore stream banks and eroded wetlands and remove barriers that prevent fish from moving upstream. Overall, the restoration of the […]]]>

Several streams and streams improvement projects in the Route 1 corridor will begin in 2022.

the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signed an agreement with the Prince George County Department of the Environment begin to restore stream banks and eroded wetlands and remove barriers that prevent fish from moving upstream.

Overall, the restoration of the Anacostia watershed is expected to restore seven miles of stream banks, open up four miles for fish to swim in, and connect 14 miles that are currently being diverted.

A list of probable projects includes removal of fish blockages on the Northwest Branch at Hyattsville, restoration of Paint Branch Creek and the Northeast Branch near Calvert Road Park in College Park and the improvement of Indian Creek in College Park.

The Corps, which has been working with the county on the proposal since 2014, should receive $ 30 million in the 2022 federal budget for projects.

The Anacostia watershed covers 176 square miles in Prince George County, Montgomery County, and DC.

You can take in fantastic wetland views from the Anacostia Riverwalk just south of Bladensburg Waterfront Park, where you’ll find an educational plaque with information on the important role wetlands play in the watershed, including filtering polluted runoff, providing food like wild rice. to various bird species, creating habitats for different types of wildlife and acting as a sponge during storm surges and absorbing flood water and stopping erosion.

If you want to help the Anacostia Watershed Society, a Bladensburg-based nonprofit that works to restore local streams and creek beds, click here.

Support the wire and community journalism
Make a one-time donation or become a regular supporter here.


Source link

]]>
State clears way for Audubon Society to stay in Milford http://birdlifemed.org/state-clears-way-for-audubon-society-to-stay-in-milford/ Sat, 07 Aug 2021 00:06:59 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/state-clears-way-for-audubon-society-to-stay-in-milford/ MILFORD – A new bill approved by the Connecticut legislature will allow the Connecticut Audubon Society to continue operating the Milford Point Coastal Center nature sanctuary on state land after the centre’s old lease expires. The bill, HB 5660, authorizes the signing of a new lease with the company. “The bill was essential,” said Patrick […]]]>

MILFORD – A new bill approved by the Connecticut legislature will allow the Connecticut Audubon Society to continue operating the Milford Point Coastal Center nature sanctuary on state land after the centre’s old lease expires.

The bill, HB 5660, authorizes the signing of a new lease with the company.

“The bill was essential,” said Patrick Comins, executive director of Connecticut Audubon. “For 25 years, the Connecticut Audubon Society has been the steward and custodian of the Milford Point Coastal Center and the 8-acre reserve that surrounds it.”

Smith thanked his fellow lawmakers for their help in passing the bill, pointing to Rep. Raghib Allie-Brennand, D-2, and Senator James Maroney, D-Milford, as particularly helpful. The center is located in the Maroney district.

With the approval of the bill, the Connecticut Audubon Society can begin negotiating a new lease with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. A new lease will ensure that the company will be able to continue the programs currently offered at the Milford Point Center, Comins said.


While the bill was being discussed, the general assembly received nearly 900 emails supporting the bill, according to the company.

One of the biggest supporters of the legislation was State Representative Frank Smith, D-118, of Milford. He said a 25-year agreement was signed in 1986 and expired in 2011, but the expiration went unnoticed and the lease was never renewed.

During these 25 years, the Coastal Center building was constructed and then inaugurated in 1995. With its completion, it has become one of the main natural and coastal habitats for birds in the northeast. Smith said his predecessor in the district, Kim Rose, was a strong supporter of the Audubon Society and called on him to make a new deal a priority if elected.

“The Coastal Center has been a good neighbor and valued member of the Milford Point community since its inception, and an exemplary tenant in the State of Connecticut as the custodian and steward of the 8-acre nature reserve it oversees.” , said Smith. “It is – and with the renewal of this transportation and lease will remain – a leading environmental and educational facility in the region, attracting students and bird enthusiasts from across the region for many years to to come. We are proud to have him in our city.

Comins said that under the care and management of Connecticut Audubon, Milford Point has been transformed into one of New England’s most important natural centers.

“It is important for the diversity of the fauna which finds places of rest, food and reproduction there,” he said. “And that’s important because Milford Point is the connection to nature, and Long Island Sound in particular, for up to 15,000 people a year, from Milford, New Haven, Bridgeport and across Connecticut.”

Comins added that nearly half of visitors are students participating in outdoor environmental education programs.

“Many of these children come from underserved areas. Their first visit to the Coastal Center is often their first visit to a nature reserve and Long Island Sound, ”said Comins. “For them it is an unparalleled experience and can serve as the basis for a life of caring for the environment and enjoying what it has to offer.”

Comins said more than 300 species of birds have been recorded at the Coastal Center. The dunes protect rare coastal plants and are a feeding ground for many migrating monarch butterflies. He said that among the most successful programs is the stewardship of several birds protected under federal and state endangered species laws.

He also expressed his gratitude to the 900 people who wrote to the General Assembly and for the support of Smith and Rose.

“A number of organizational partners and community leaders have submitted testimonials in support of the legislation, and we are also deeply grateful to them,” Comins said.

According to the official Connecticut Audubon Society website, the company’s mission is to protect Connecticut birds, other wildlife, and their habitats through conservation, education, and advocacy. The company was founded in 1898 and operates natural facilities in Fairfield, Milford, Pomfret, Hampton, Sherman and Old Lyme and an EcoTravel office in Essex.

“The Coastal Center’s annual operating budget is collected entirely by the Connecticut Audubon Society from foundations, program revenues, memberships, donations and unrestricted reserves,” Smith said. “His association with Connecticut and National Audubon organizations underscores his commitment to conserving local bird habitats as well as protecting, educating and preserving the critical ecosystem of Long Island Sound.


Source link

]]>