Restoring Bird Habitats – Birdlife Med http://birdlifemed.org/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 02:23:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Benefits of conservation and recreation in Jobs for Nature http://birdlifemed.org/benefits-of-conservation-and-recreation-in-jobs-for-nature/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 22:00:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/benefits-of-conservation-and-recreation-in-jobs-for-nature/ Thursday, September 16, 2021, 10:00 a.m.Press Release: Fiordland Trails Trust (Friday, September 17, 2021) The Fiordland Trails Trust is excited to embark on a three-year project under the government’s Jobs for Nature initiative that will expand and improve Fiordland’s trail system, create jobs and lead to huge conservation gains in the region. The Fiordland Trails […]]]>

(Friday, September 17, 2021) The Fiordland Trails Trust is excited to embark on a three-year project under the government’s Jobs for Nature initiative that will expand and improve Fiordland’s trail system, create jobs and lead to huge conservation gains in the region.

The Fiordland Trails Trust is responsible for the Lake 2 Lake Trail; a multi-use trail that runs from Te Anau to Manapouri (except a 4 km stretch of the State Highway). He has always had the ambition to develop a trail from Te Anau to Te Anau Downs and now, with funding from the Jobs for Nature program, is able to start this work, alongside a host of other conservation projects. within the trail network.

The $ 973,000 Jobs for Nature funded project will include a major weed control, predator control and native planting program along the Lake 2 Lake Trail and in the Delta region. of the Upukerora River. It will create jobs for 15 full-time equivalents over time (around 50 seasonal part-time positions) and allow the Trust to start stages one and two of the Te Anau Trail to Te Anau Downs (a co-funded part of the project).

Fiordland Trails Trust spokesperson John Greaney said the project was extremely positive for the Fiordland region.

“We are delighted that, through Jobs for Nature, we can support employment in Fiordland with results that will have continued and long-term benefits for locals and visitors,” he said.

“The extension of the trail will be great. Within three years, the trail is expected to extend to Patience Bay and Sinclair Road. Indeed, this will form stages one and two of the Te Anau Trail to Te Anau Downs, which is a long term goal for the Trust. “

“The weed and predator control program, as well as the planting of native species along the existing Lake 2 trail and in the Upukerora Delta area, will not only be fantastic for the biodiversity of the region, but will really enhance the recreational experience. “

The overall project consists of five sub-projects, which will be managed simultaneously. They understand:

  • Noxious weed control (gorse and broom) in an existing Lake 2 Lake trail corridor and new trail extension
  • Improved plantation with selected natives on the lake 2 corridor of the lake, to help control erosion, improve visual appeal and promote native fauna
  • On the lower delta of the Upukerora river
  • a program for the clearing of exotic species, replacement and enhancement by native plant species and their maintenance
  • a predator control program over an area of ​​345 ha, to protect the nesting areas of rare and braided river birds on the delta and the river bed
  • Restoration of the Patience Bay wetland
  • Improving the habitat of braided river birds by removing weeds from the river bed
  • The installation of interpretive panels on the trail network
  • A 6 km extension of the existing trail network through partial funding of stages one and two of the Te Anau Trail to Te Anau Downs

Waka Kotahi offered support at the start of the project and has already fully funded and completed a road bridge over the Upukerora River.

The Fiordland Trails Trust partnered with the Lower Upukerora Restoration Group (LURG) which provided the framework for biodiversity improvements. LURG representative Vanessa Horwell said biodiversity improvements focus on protecting the rare and endangered braided river birds that nest in the Upukerora River and Delta region, including the striped fruit bat. Nationally Vulnerable, the Endangered Laughing Tern and the Nationally Critical Black-billed Gull, as well as other species such as the South Island Oystercatcher and the Stilt of foot.

“The proposed predator trapping network and weed control will increase the chances of successful reproduction of these river birds by providing clear areas of the riverbed for nesting and reducing predators that prey on the eggs. , chicks and nesting birds, ”said Vanessa.

“The extensive native plantations along the Upukerora River and in the Patience Bay wetland will provide habitat and food for native birds and invertebrates, and weed control in the riverbed will provide nesting sites. suitable for river birds. “

John says: “The project is a true partnership between the Department of Conservation, the Fiordland Trails Trust, the Lower Upukerora Restoration Group and the local Fiordland community, with everyone working together and collaboratively to support the initiative.

“We are really excited about the benefits for Fiordland and look forward to keeping the community informed as the work progresses. “

Work is expected to begin soon on the deforestation of exotic trees in the Upukerora River Delta area to initiate the native planting project, and construction of the trail will also begin soon.

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ACB joins the Asian initiative on ecosystem restoration http://birdlifemed.org/acb-joins-the-asian-initiative-on-ecosystem-restoration/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 16:03:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/acb-joins-the-asian-initiative-on-ecosystem-restoration/ The forests of Asia are of immense ecological, social and economic importance, covering 549 million hectares, or 14 percent of the total global coverage. The area provides vital ecosystem services and protection from climate impacts for 4.5 billion people living in the region. These ecosystems contribute to the spiritual, cultural and physical well-being of people […]]]>

The forests of Asia are of immense ecological, social and economic importance, covering 549 million hectares, or 14 percent of the total global coverage. The area provides vital ecosystem services and protection from climate impacts for 4.5 billion people living in the region.

These ecosystems contribute to the spiritual, cultural and physical well-being of people in Asia and the Pacific.

With increasing pressures on biodiversity in recent years, the conservation of vital habitats and ecosystems has become an urgent priority.

Executive Director Dr. Theresa Mundita S. Lim of the ASEAN Center for Biodiversity (ACB) said the economic benefits arising from the sustainable use of biological resources are essential to the overall stability of ASEAN.

“Disruptions to these vital ecological processes can therefore have substantial or even serious impacts affecting the safety, health and well-being of individuals and communities,” Lim said.

ACB joined the ‘International Symposium on Ecosystem Restoration for Green Asia and Peace’, an online event held on August 18 that aims to network among forest-related institutions in the Asian region, policy makers and international organizations.

The symposium was organized by the Korea Society of Forestry Sciences and the Institutes of Biosciences and Green Technologies at Seoul National University.

He highlighted success stories and lessons learned from ecosystem restoration projects or programs in Asia, including regional organizations, such as ACB and the Asian Forestry Cooperation Organization (AFoCO), who shared and discussed their respective greening strategies.

These reforestation initiatives contribute to the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration, a global call to rehabilitate and restore the world’s vulnerable ecosystems.

ASEAN Green Initiative

Among Asean’s responses to the global call for ecosystem restoration is the Asean Green Initiative (AGI), which was launched on August 6.

Led by ACB and the Asean Secretariat, the AGI aims to recognize the best ecosystem restoration activities in the region that focus on a holistic and participatory approach in the regeneration and conservation of vital ecosystems and habitats. for wildlife.

The initiative encourages the planting of at least 10 million native tree species in the 10 ASEAN Member States (AMS) over a period of 10 years – or 10.10.10 – in harmony with the Decade of Nations United for Ecosystem Restoration.

“The 10.10.10 target is just the start of a collective greening movement in the region, and even beyond,” Lim said.

She stressed that “meaningful collaboration and cooperation among development and dialogue partners” are essential to intensify regeneration and restoration efforts.

Establish all over Asia

After the symposium, ACB and AFoCO met to discuss common areas of collaboration.

Capacity development for forestry and biodiversity conservation, mapping of degraded ecosystems and promotion of AGI were among the steps identified during the meeting.

The formation of a working group composed of representatives of the two regional organizations is in preparation to better flesh out the concept and plans of the future partnership.

The ACB also had initial talks for a possible partnership with the Republic of Korea, particularly in the area of ​​coastal and marine conservation.

Lim said Korea’s green growth policies could be synchronized with ACB’s efforts to mainstream biodiversity into various sectors, including business, industries and finance.

During the symposium, she pointed out that pro-nature prospects and processes in the economic and financial sectors would alleviate the pressure of land use expansion and conversion which has a huge impact on large areas. forests and other vital ecosystems.

Restoring ecosystems is a massive global endeavor that would take a holistic approach to society. Thus, cultivating these partnerships and forging a solid cooperation within and beyond ASEAN is essential to rebuild better and more ecologically.

In addition to ACB and AFoCO, other regional organizations, such as the Center for International Forestry Research and the Mekong Institute, attended the international symposium, as well as resource persons from Cambodia, Indonesia, Korea from the South, the Philippines, Mongolia, Vietnam and Uzbekistan who also shared their respective greening strategies.

Image courtesy of Ramon Ramirez from the DENR website


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Habitat project nearing completion in the Chain-O-Sloughs Wildlife Management Area http://birdlifemed.org/habitat-project-nearing-completion-in-the-chain-o-sloughs-wildlife-management-area/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 22:28:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/habitat-project-nearing-completion-in-the-chain-o-sloughs-wildlife-management-area/ Work will end this fall on a habitat restoration project in the Chain-O-Sloughs Wildlife Management Area (WMA), south of Ivanhoe in Lincoln County. Contractors remove unwanted trees and brush from a 40-acre area of ​​the WMA. These trees and brush will be cut, stumped, stacked and burnt once there is three inches of snow cover. […]]]>

Work will end this fall on a habitat restoration project in the Chain-O-Sloughs Wildlife Management Area (WMA), south of Ivanhoe in Lincoln County.

Contractors remove unwanted trees and brush from a 40-acre area of ​​the WMA. These trees and brush will be cut, stumped, stacked and burnt once there is three inches of snow cover. Unwanted trees include the non-native Russian olive tree as well as the native plum and cedar that have encroached on the grasslands.

Strategic tree felling is part of a management plan from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources designed to maintain balance with the surrounding grassland ecosystem. The project will provide better nesting and brood rearing habitat for prairie-nesting pheasants and waterfowl, as well as other grassland-dependent species. It will also benefit pollinators such as bees and butterflies. Each WMA is managed according to an individual plan developed by MNR Wildlife staff.

“It is important to note that the dense cedar stands and shrub plantations that provide valuable winter cover for wildlife will remain on the unit,” said Amber Knutson, assistant manager of wildlife for the Marshall region. “We are targeting scattered trees that degrade the habitat of grassland species. “

Habitat improvements will provide a better experience for hunters, hikers and bird watchers.

The project is a partnership with Forever Pheasants and its Public Land Improvement Program and the Lessard-Sams Outdoor Heritage Council.

The Outdoor Heritage Fund was created after voters approved the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment in November 2008, which increased sales tax by three-eighths of 1%. The fund receives one-third of sales tax dollars and can only be spent to restore, protect and enhance wetlands, grasslands, forests, and game fish and wildlife habitat.

The WMAs are open to the public year round and provide opportunities for hunting, fishing, trapping and wildlife viewing. For more information, visit the MNR website.


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Wildlife habitats restored thanks to a world first invention http://birdlifemed.org/wildlife-habitats-restored-thanks-to-a-world-first-invention/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 21:10:34 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/wildlife-habitats-restored-thanks-to-a-world-first-invention/ Cutting-edge technology has been used to reconstruct more than 800 new natural habitats for native animals displaced after the 2019-2020 bushfires in New South Wales. The government of New South Wales has invested $ 165,000 to carve new tree hollows using ‘Hollowhog’, an Australian invention that has minimal impact on tree health and integrity. . […]]]>

Cutting-edge technology has been used to reconstruct more than 800 new natural habitats for native animals displaced after the 2019-2020 bushfires in New South Wales.

The government of New South Wales has invested $ 165,000 to carve new tree hollows using ‘Hollowhog’, an Australian invention that has minimal impact on tree health and integrity. .

Matt Stephens, Transport for NSW environmental officer and conservation biologist, invented the Hollowhog, after 10 years of problem-solving to create sustainable homes for wildlife.

Regional Transport and Roads Minister Paul Toole said the use of the technology in New South Wales is a world first.

“Creating hollows in mature trees is important because 15% of Australia’s wildlife depend on them for nesting and habitation – that’s over a quarter of reptiles like goannas, geckos and pythons, 17% of birds and about 30% of mammals. “said Mr. Toole.

The Black Summer bushfires destroyed 5.5 million hectares of tree hollows that opossums, gliders, micro bats and birds use to breed, shelter and protect themselves. Hollowhog has so far replaced destroyed habitat in 20 locations around the regional NSW.

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. See it in full here.


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Outside: Large stream habitat project underway in Center County http://birdlifemed.org/outside-large-stream-habitat-project-underway-in-center-county/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 13:30:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/outside-large-stream-habitat-project-underway-in-center-county/ Crawler Excavator Operator Terry Allen arranges boulders to create a rock deflector at Sparrow Run as the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Georgia Harbor checks the water depth. MARC NALE For the CDT Heavy equipment in a favorite trout stream is usually bad news for fish and anglers. However, that’s exactly what’s happening at Sparrow […]]]>

title=s

Crawler Excavator Operator Terry Allen arranges boulders to create a rock deflector at Sparrow Run as the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Georgia Harbor checks the water depth.

For the CDT

Heavy equipment in a favorite trout stream is usually bad news for fish and anglers. However, that’s exactly what’s happening at Sparrow Run – a major tributary of the upper reaches of Bald Eagle Creek – and that’s good news, not bad.

A major stream restoration project is underway in Taylor Township, Center County. The project covers nearly half a mile of Sparrow Run and includes at least 38 habitat enhancing devices.

“The habitat structures will dramatically improve the survival rate of native brook trout in the creek,” said Bob Vierck, President Emeritus of the Spring Creek Chapter of Trout Unlimited. “Sparrow Run is a stream that suffers from frequent flooding. The extensive shoreline stabilization structures will significantly reduce sediment and nutrients downstream of Sayers Dam and ultimately Chesapeake Bay. “

At the confluence of the streams near the village of Hannah, Sparrow Run more than doubles the flow of Bald Eagle Creek. The current habitat project covers nearly 2,000 feet of former farmland that suffered major erosion from the stream that was displaced approximately 100 years ago. However, the story affecting Sparrow Run began long before that.

The Hannah Kiln was built around 1830 to produce pig iron. The iron ore was hand mined from the top of the adjacent Bald Eagle mountain and descended to the valley floor with an inclined plane – the ruins of which still exist. Limestone was transported by cart to the stove, and loggers and charcoal burners produced charcoal from hardwoods growing on the adjacent hills. An average stove consumes about 800 bushels of charcoal per day, which is also brought to the stove in rail cars.

During the period of operation, the furnace supported a thriving village and related industries, some of which dammed Sparrow Run to provide water power. This paved the way for some of the issues the stream faces today.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service’s fishing and wildlife partners designed the habitat project in 2018, and then Trout Unlimited, led by Vierck, applied for funding.

According to the project plan, nine mudslides will protect approximately 500 feet of shoreline and provide aerial cover for the fish. Ten rocky transverse vanes will maintain the slope of the stream and shift the flow towards the center of the channel. Excellent fish habitat is often created immediately below the transverse vanes. Seven stone deflectors will protect approximately 480 feet of bank from erosion. Weathervanes and groups of random blocks will provide habitat for the trout. However, the finished product will not exactly follow the plan.

“We designed this project three years ago, and due to the flooding and unstable river banks, we had to make adjustments to our original plan as we went along,” said Adam Smith, a fish and wildlife biologist who leads the Partners for Fish and Wildlife project. “The more than three inches of rain that fell in one day during construction allowed us to see the type of high water we need to design and build for.”

The project started three weeks ago with hemlock logs, large flat-sided rocks and other materials assembled at the site. Several mudflats, rock deflectors and rocky transverse vanes have already been completed. The sowing and mulching carried out with the first devices already germinate grasses and clover.

The $ 137,500 habitat project is largely funded by the Hamer Foundation, with additional funding of $ 9,000 from Trout Unlimited’s Embrace a Stream fund, $ 5,000 from TU’s Spring Creek Chapter, as well as contributions in-kind from Partners for Fish of the US Fish and Wildlife Service. and wildlife. Landowners offer gracious cooperation.

“The year we received the Embrace a Stream grant, Sparrow Run was the top ranked project nationally and the chapter received a bamboo fly rod, which we used to raise an additional one thousand dollars,” said Vierck.

Smith and his team of two to six people expect to complete the project in September.

“For us at USFWS, our priority is always restoring wildlife habitat,” Smith said. “At Sparrow Run, this will help the brook trout and migrating birds along the creek and in the buffer zones – great blue herons, wood ducks, warblers and woodcock in the bottoms and thickets. We recently focused on the benefits of stream restoration for wood turtles.

“At the end of the day, we love to restore waterways and habitat for fish and wildlife,” Smith added. “We especially love restoring streams for landowners, but I generally find that we restore landowners in streams just as much, as well as streams for anyone who uses them. “


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Town crier Contoocook for August 22, 2021 http://birdlifemed.org/town-crier-contoocook-for-august-22-2021/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 13:46:18 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/town-crier-contoocook-for-august-22-2021/ BOW An avian expert present at the club ■ The Bow Garden Club will meet in person for the first time since 2019 to hold a meeting of its members on September 13 at Old Town Hall. Doors will open at 6 pm for refreshments and socializing, followed by a presentation from Dr. Pamela Hunt, […]]]>
BOW An avian expert present at the club

■ The Bow Garden Club will meet in person for the first time since 2019 to hold a meeting of its members on September 13 at Old Town Hall. Doors will open at 6 pm for refreshments and socializing, followed by a presentation from Dr. Pamela Hunt, avian conservation biologist at NH Audubon, entitled “The State of the Birds of New Hampshire”. Dr. Hunt will report on the status of our birds in New Hampshire with regards to bird population trends and the major threats facing our birds and their habitats today. Dr Hunt will also brief us on conservation strategies that we can all do something about. This presentation is free and everyone is welcome. A brief business meeting will follow the presentation. Please contact BGC President and Membership President Keryn Anderson at (603) 856-8563 or bow@nhfgc.org with any questions or to request a Membership Information Form, or simply come to the meeting ! Unvaccinated people should wear a mask.

JOYCE KIMBALL

bowcomnews@comcast.net

DUNBARTON Rodeo by bike next weekend

■ The 4th Annual Dunbarton Police Bike Rodeo is scheduled for August 29 from 2 pm to 4 pm at 20 Robert Rogers Rd. Check out free bike helmets, tune-ups and more. For more information contact Sargent Christopher Remillard at ChrisRemillard@gsinet.net

■ The first day of school is August 30. No school on Labor Day (September 2).

■ This month, the DCC Book Club reads “In The Slender Margin” by Eve Joseph. The book will be discussed on September 2 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Zoom.

■ The library will be closed on September 4th. Library opening hours will be adjusted from August 24 to September 14, Tuesday to Friday (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) and Saturday (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.). The curbside collections for everyone will continue indefinitely!

■ This month the library’s book club will read “When Books Went to War,” by Molly Guptill Manning. “When America entered World War II in 1941, we faced an enemy who had banned and burned 100 million pounds. Indignant librarians have launched a campaign to send free books to US troops, garnering 20 million hard-bound donations. A discussion on the book is scheduled for September 15 at noon around the bandstand, weather permitting. Bring your chair and your lunch. If the weather forecast is bad, the meeting will be virtual. Copies of the book are now available for pickup!

NORA LEDUC

774-3141

dtowncrier@gmail.com

HENNIKER / PORTERPuppet show

■ The free Tucker Library presents Lindsay & Her Puppet Friends at 2 p.m. on September 18 as part of Henniker’s Music on Main Street.

■ Weare has an outdoor market every Saturday from 10 am to 1 pm, rain or shine, May through November, at 65 North Stark Highway.

■ The Henniker Summer Concerts end with two other performances. This Tuesday from 6.30 p.m. to 8 p.m., the group of nine musicians Groove Alliance performs.

■ Music at the Henniker Farmer’s Market will continue until the fall. This Thursday, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., it’s Beechwood.

■ August. 30 new school days for all students of Henniker and Weare public schools.

TOM DUNN

dunn.t@comcast.net

WARNINGLearn more about butterflies

■ The Warner Historical Society is looking for volunteers on August 22 at 10 am to help with the annual clean-up of the Lower Warner Meeting House. Contact us at (603) 456-2437 to help with this special program or to find out more about other volunteer opportunities.

■ Discover the monarch butterflies on August 26 at 10:30 am on the terrace of Jim Mitchell Park. Webster author and photographer Sharon Rask-Huntington will read her wonderful picture book about the life cycle of monarch butterflies, “Mirabelle’s Metamorphosis”. This special story time is sponsored by MainStreet BookEnds and promoted by Pillsbury Free Library’s weekly Thursday story time. The books will be available for purchase and signature.

■ Join us at MainStreet BookEnds on August 28 at 4 pm for the launch party for LR Berger’s latest book of poetry, “Debted to the Wind”. LR Berger’s work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the PEN New England Discovery Award, and the NH State Council on the Arts.

■ The Warner Historical Society’s Lower Warner Meeting Room will host a special worship service by Warner United Church on August 29 at 10 am. The meeting room will be open to visitors later today from 1 pm to 3 pm, providing a rare opportunity to view the interior of an 1840s meeting house. The exterior is freshly painted and the windows and shutters are beautifully restored by Jason Labbe. For more information, contact the Historical Society office at info@warnerhistorical.org or (603) 456-2437.

■ Come to an Orchid Care workshop on August 29 at 2 p.m. at Blue Moon Farm. George Crozer, owner of Midvale Tropicals, formerly of Crozer and Crozer Orchids in New London, will give a talk on basic orchid care and repotting, followed by a question and answer session. Bring your orchid for advice on best growing practices. The price is $ 20 for the conference, $ 50 includes an orchid to take home.

■ Free meals for children 18 and under are available July 1 through August 30 through the Kearsarge School District, which participates in the USDA exemption from eligibility. Pick up two days of breakfast and lunch on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at area schools. Visit www.kearsarg.org for more information and to complete a meal order form.

■ The Warner Historical Society Barn Sale is open Saturday 9 am to noon, and Tuesdays 1 pm to 4 pm in August. Donations can be deposited on weekdays.

■ Registration is open for the Warner Fall Foliage Festival 5K Road Race, taking place on October 9 at 9:30 am Visit the WFFF Facebook page, www.wfff.org, or go to https : //www.racemenu.com / events / 203212-Warner-Fall-Foliage-Festival-5K-Run-Walk? rm = 1733600 & to register.

■ Registration for fall youth soccer is open! Football takes place from September to October and is open to children aged 4 to 12. The football program is organized by the Merrimack Valley Soccer League with volunteer coaches. Visit our website at http://www.mvsl.org for more information or register online at https://go.teamsnap.com/forms/276592. Or visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wysayouthsports.

■ The Nature Discovery Center is open on Fridays and Sundays (12 pm to 4 pm) and Saturdays (10.30 am to 4 pm), or by appointment for a group. There is a small entrance fee (cash or check only.) In addition to activities for children, the Nature Discovery Center offers a large and varied collection of nature exhibits. Also come have fun and win prizes! Call (603) 822-2334 for more information.

■ The Warner Fall Foliage Festival Board of Directors would like to inform the community of plans for the Warner Fall Foliage Festival October 8-10. We will still have many artisans, musical events, rides and the traditional oxen and lumberjack competition. However, out of excess of caution, we are canceling the Grand Parade, the Children’s Parade and the Children’s Race. We monitor national and national guidelines and have made those decisions to help participants stay safe and healthy. Hope to see you in October! Visit wfff.org for more information or follow us on Facebook.

■ Take advantage of free yoga in the field at Pumpkin Blossom Farm, Fridays, 9 am-10am. Details and registration on our website pumpkinblossomfarm.com/yogar.

Farmsteads of New England is at the Warner Connects NH Food Pantry every Thursday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. No appointments, no paperwork, just wonderful, fresh, locally grown food! Located at the back of the Community Center building. For anyone confined to the house, delivery is available! Contact (603) 456-2053

■ Are you looking to pick fresh fruit? Find area farm stalls and picking locations in the 2021 Merrimack County Local Food Guide, now available online at merrimackccd.org, or in print at the library!

Elibet hunting

warnertowncrier@gmail.com


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Maya Lin explains how art can lead us to a sustainable future – ARTnews.com http://birdlifemed.org/maya-lin-explains-how-art-can-lead-us-to-a-sustainable-future-artnews-com/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 16:56:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/maya-lin-explains-how-art-can-lead-us-to-a-sustainable-future-artnews-com/ So many of us live in cities, and are so far removed from nature. I grew up in Athens, Ohio, surrounded by woods. Behind our house were three wooded ridges separated by streams; all my childhood was spent playing in these woods and on these hills. I called the one in the middle the “lizard […]]]>

So many of us live in cities, and are so far removed from nature. I grew up in Athens, Ohio, surrounded by woods. Behind our house were three wooded ridges separated by streams; all my childhood was spent playing in these woods and on these hills. I called the one in the middle the “lizard back” because it came out of the creek bed, like a tail. It developed into a long, winding ridge and ended in what to my brother and I looked like the head of a lizard.

My relationship with the natural world was formed while playing in these hills, but I was also influenced over these years by the emergence of environmental movements that shaped the way governments created protections for an air. and cleaner water, and for endangered species. Growing up, I was extremely aware of how the actions of one species, humanity, had such a damaging effect on the environment. These feelings and concerns that I always carry with me, but with climate change threatening the planet and us, it has become an increasingly pressing issue for me.

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What is our relationship with nature in the 21st century, with climate change being one of the biggest threats we face and so much of our worldview? And how should we rethink our relationship to this world? In my work, I’m intrigued by the idea of ​​trying to reconnect with the natural world – to maybe get you to pause and listen and take a closer look at what’s around us, things that you don’t. you may not have watched or listened to since. you were a child. My works have been shaped by the reactions I have had to the sites they occupy, trying to explore new ways to change your perception of the site itself and connect with your immediate natural surroundings. .

With Ghost forest in Midtown Manhattan, I bring together a need to make you aware of the horrific threats we face as a result of climate change, and a need to connect in an intimate and powerful way to the simple yet majestic beauty of nature. I wanted to bring you face to face with these mighty and beautiful trees that grow so close to Manhattan – they come from New Jersey – and are quickly disappearing. They form a silent grove that bears witness to the immense and almost incomprehensible disappearance of the global forest, and yet there is a haunting beauty in them. I see them as gentle, silent giants that I ask you to know.

An Asian woman with black rimmed glasses sits with her arms crossed in front of an architectural model.

Maya Lin.
Photo Jesse Frohman

I started my career working on the themes of memory and loss, and throughout my life I have been drawn to these works of memory, while pursuing both my artistic and architectural practices. With Ghost forest I was able to create something that is an environmental sculptural work of art as well as part of one of my more advocacy oriented projects, What is missing?, a memorial dedicated to raising awareness of what we are losing from the natural world that also emphasizes what can be done to help both protect and restore species and habitats as well as reduce emissions from climate change.

Around the world, climate change is killing large swathes of forests. These are called ghost forests, and they are being killed by rising temperatures, deforestation, saltwater flooding as the sea rises, forest fires, and the insects whose populations thrive in these warmer temperatures. ; the trees themselves are more susceptible to beetles due to the excessive stress caused by rising temperatures. In southwest Colorado, where my family and I live in the summer, national forest lands show signs of beetle infestation one season, with the upper needles turning reddish brown, and the next season the entire stand is dead.

Thinking of a sculptural installation for the Madison Square Park Conservancy, I knew I wanted to create something that would be intimately connected with the park itself, the trees, and the state of the earth. Being more used to doing large-scale permanent works, I knew that a different approach had to be taken, that I wanted to create something transient and temporal rather than one that looked more like one of my permanent pieces. This is not a time frame that I know in my outdoor facilities.

Planting trees was an idea that seemed to fit into the project’s temporality. As I mulled over how to approach this project and site, I couldn’t help but gaze at the Ghost Forest just outside my studio in Colorado, which overlooks these National Forest Lands. I felt I needed to bring a ghost forest to the heart of Manhattan and find trees as close to Manhattan as possible.

My team and I located trees in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey: 150 miles from town, an Atlantic cedar stand was dying due to a flood of salt water from a neighboring estuary. Foresters were working with the local landowner to clear this dying grove as part of a forestry practice that will allow tree regeneration, as cedars need open light to repopulate. We are “borrowing” these trees for the 6 month installation – and this grove will continue to decompose and bear witness to the full seasonal cycle of living trees in the park.

I believe awareness is key to getting people to want to take action, but I also believe that climate change is happening so quickly that it is not enough to just wake people up to the issues we are facing. I think it’s important to also focus on what each of us can do to help. Our land use practices are a major cause of emissions and a factor in the loss of species. Reforming our forestry practices, reforming our agricultural and livestock practices, and protecting and restoring our forests, grasslands and wetlands, these nature-based solutions can potentially offset and sequester significant amounts of global emissions (50 to 90 percent ). They would not only help protect the planet’s biodiversity, but also ensure its increase and restoration.

A grassy field in a mountainous landscape with man-made wavy formations.

Lin created three ripples Wave field pieces, the first two for sites in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Miami, Florida. The third – and largest – is pictured here at the Storm King Art Center in upstate New York.
Photo Jerry Thompson / Courtesy Storm King Art Center

Within the framework of Ghost forest, and in collaboration with the Natural Areas Conservancy, a thousand trees and shrubs will be planted to offset the carbon emissions produced during the realization of the work of art. Throughout the 3 years of planning and installation, we have been able to calculate our carbon footprint. About 5.3 tonnes of carbon have been emitted, and over the next 10 years these thousands of trees will absorb some 60 tonnes of carbon, offsetting more than the carbon output of the work of art.

Ghost forest is the last installation of what I consider my fifth and final memorial, What is missing?, a nonprofit foundation I created to raise awareness about the ongoing sixth mass extinction, focusing attention on species and places that have gone or will most likely become extinct in our lifetimes if we don’t do not act to protect them. An essential part of the foundation’s mission is not only to make you aware of what we are losing, but to emphasize that by protecting and restoring habitats and reforming our land use practices, we can effectively “saving two birds with one tree”, both protecting species and reducing emissions.

Like my other works, What is missing? (and Ghost forest as part of it) is about nature and our relationship with it, focusing on what we lose in the natural world and presenting both specific actions that everyone can take to help as well as to consider new macro ways of seeing a different outcome for us and for our planet. I see the overall concept as an art project based on the science of guerrilla warfare that continues to grow and evolve: I build this memorial for all to see and revise it as I go. What is missing? is a memorial that can exist in many forms and places; Ghost forest is, so far, the most visible manifestation.

Last spring, when Ghost forest opened, marked the smooth launch of our revamped website to What is missing?, whatismissing.org, with a more public launch slated for the fall. As with many of my works, time is truly the setting for this memorial. What is missing? presents an ecological history of the planet: past, present and future. What we are losing or have lost, stories of conservation successes and failures at present, and, finally, greenprint, which presents a macro reflection on plausible future scenarios that will balance our needs with those of the planet.

I believe that art can help us imagine and map sustainable future scenarios and in doing so, give people a way to see and hope for a different future. I think people are overwhelmed by the issues we face and feel helpless. What is missing? shows how the actions of each person can make a difference and how art can sometimes present new ways of approaching the issues we face in a way that makes those issues seem like evolutionary. It can help us see how much of a difference our actions can make.

Part of the website asks visitors to share a personal memory of something they have seen diminish or disappear from the natural world. In doing so, they become a part of this growing collective online memorial, and perhaps reconnect with nature as well. I also invite you to contribute.


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This favorite island of endangered birds is sometimes here – and sometimes not http://birdlifemed.org/this-favorite-island-of-endangered-birds-is-sometimes-here-and-sometimes-not/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 15:00:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/this-favorite-island-of-endangered-birds-is-sometimes-here-and-sometimes-not/ Pelican Shoal, off the Lower Keys, was never an island – about an acre of coral debris and sand. But it has special significance in Florida for an endangered species of bird. Mimi Stafford has frequented the area since the 1960s. “I’ve seen it come and go over the decades. There are years when it’s […]]]>

Pelican Shoal, off the Lower Keys, was never an island – about an acre of coral debris and sand. But it has special significance in Florida for an endangered species of bird.

Mimi Stafford has frequented the area since the 1960s.

“I’ve seen it come and go over the decades. There are years when it’s a pretty big island and there are years when it’s flooded,” she said.

In 1990, 300 pairs of Roseate Terns were nesting on the island. It was the primary nesting site in Florida for seabirds, listed under the federal Endangered Species Act. The state has called Pelican Shoal a critical wildlife preserve and has banned people from visiting the island. If people get close, they can scare birds away from their nests and the eggs will fail.

When the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary emerged in the mid-1990s, Pelican Shoal was designated as a Wildlife Management Area.

But then the 2005 hurricane season arrived.

“It was just a really bad year, especially in the Keys,” said Ricardo Zambrano, regional biologist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. “We had four hurricanes and a tropical storm that year, just back to back.”

First Hurricane Dennis, then Rita, dramatically reduced the size of the island.

“Then of course the final blow was Wilma,” Zambrano said. “It was just wiped off the wipe.”

Twelve years later, Hurricane Irma passed through the Lower Keys and Pelican Shoal reappeared. State wildlife managers continued to check the island and were awarded in 2019.

“The birds were back and the island had grown again. And not only grew, but the birds are nesting. We were very pleasantly surprised,” Zambrano said.

Zambrano says there were around 50 roseate tern nest pairs on Pelican Shoal that year. The following year, a storm hit the island again.

The island is still there, but “very narrow, very low, not suitable for nesting,” he said. “So the question is, what are we doing to protect the species, to keep it from going extinct in Florida?” “

The state considered reviving or restoring the island by adding dead coral, sand and rocks to it, but that would be difficult. It is near seagrass beds and coral reefs.

The state has tried to set up nesting platforms to mimic the flat, rocky habitat preferred by Roseate Terns, but that has not worked.

“We attracted fewer terns, but no roseate terns,” Zambrano said.

The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary is updating its management plan, which may include changes to areas with special protection like Pelican Shoal. A draft version of the plan had removed these protections, since nesting had ended there. But Zambrano said the sanctuary may want to reconsider its decision, as 50 Roseate Terns nested on the island just two years ago.

And Pelican Shoal isn’t the only island to have left the landscape of the Keys. An island that locals dubbed “Wilma Key” appeared in the Key West National Wildlife Refuge after that storm and has since disappeared again.

Chris Bergh of The Nature Conservancy said protecting ephemeral islands that appear after storms can be a challenge, even when they provide excellent habitat for wildlife.

“They’re also a great habitat for people to go out, hang out and throw frisbees, drink beer, and run dogs,” he said.

A version of the new rules proposed by the sanctuary included provisions to expand emergency rules – which could apply to habitat that appears after storms. The restoration plan should be made public in the fall.

This year, only 39 pairs of Roseate Terns have nested in Florida, on the rooftops of three government buildings in Marathon and Key West. The building where they nestled in Key West, as part of the Joint Interagency Task Force South, is expected to be demolished within a few years.

Copyright 2021 WLRN 91.3 FM


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Maine Gardener: Why Maine Audubon added non-native plants to its sale http://birdlifemed.org/maine-gardener-why-maine-audubon-added-non-native-plants-to-its-sale/ Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:00:18 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/maine-gardener-why-maine-audubon-added-non-native-plants-to-its-sale/ When I read on the Maine Audubon Society website that the organization had started selling non-Maine plants, I was surprised. I was sure the environment mainstay hadn’t given up on its commitment to the plants that Maine’s birds, insects, and other species need to survive. But I wondered what caused the change. The added non-natives […]]]>

When I read on the Maine Audubon Society website that the organization had started selling non-Maine plants, I was surprised.

I was sure the environment mainstay hadn’t given up on its commitment to the plants that Maine’s birds, insects, and other species need to survive. But I wondered what caused the change.

The added non-natives are good plants. One of them, Liatris scariosa or the northern flaming star, is native to York County but not the rest of the state, by the standards used by Audubon. Audubon had therefore previously excluded him from the sale of plants.

Eric Topper, explaining the change, said some birds, insects and other animals, as well as some plants, have extended their historical range, mainly north and east as the climate has warmed. So why wouldn’t Audubon sell plants whose historical range is somewhat south and west of Maine.

The change was not an instant decision.

“Since we’ve been in the world of native plant restoration six or seven years now, we’ve struggled to define our definition of native plants,” Topper said in a telephone interview.

When sales began, Maine Audubon opted for the list, also used by state officials, called BONAP, the Biota of North America program, which has long studied native plants. Audubon also consulted with state officials, and if the state thought a factory shouldn’t be on the list, it was removed, Topper said.

As a result, the list of native Maine Audubon plants for sale (mainenativeplants.org) was among the most restrictive of the native Maine listings.

Over the years, with real life experience, those in charge have started to question boundaries. Audubon staff have noticed how much hummingbirds love Monarda didyma, with the common names scarlet bee balm or red bergamot.

While working in greenhouses to water the plants, bumblebees (which are native) cover and worship Liatris spicata.

So, Audubon added these plants, which are not strictly native according to the definition she chose to use, because of their enormous benefits to birds and other wildlife that Maine Audubon’s mission is to protect.

Topper said his organization did not make the decision without outside help. He received help from Dan Jaffe, now a horticulturist at the Norcross Wildlife Foundation in Massachusetts, who co-authored the book “Native Plants for New England Gardens” while with the Native Plant Trust.

In addition to Liatris spicata, Monarda didyma, and Liatris scariosa, other non-native plants added to Audubon are Echinacea purpurea or purple coneflower, and Coreopsis lanceolata or lanceleaf coreopsis – both native to the northeastern United States but not Maine.

Buyers seem to have agreed with Audubon’s choice. Scarlet Bee Balm, Spearleaf Coreopsis, and Purple Echinacea are already sold out for this year.

Topper encourages people to research these species – not cultivars of those species, which would have a brand name with single quotes at the end – at local nurseries, and plant them.

I asked Topper if selling plants that might not be strictly native to Maine amounted to assisted migration. There has been some concern, which I spoke about in 2018, that plants might go extinct because their natural habitats are getting too hot for them to live. And these plants cannot naturally migrate as fast as climate change moves their ideal climate further north.

Topper said the sales could help with the migration, but that was not the group’s intention. He thinks the species got to Maine anyway, because people love them and planted them in their gardens.

One thing Topper said towards the end of our interview surprised me. Despite Maine Audubon’s emphasis on native species, he realizes that non-natives also have a great advantage in wildlife. He had just spent a week in the heart of nature, places where the forest has taken over from abandoned farms. Apple trees – native to Kazakhstan – in these woods still thrive and are a huge boon to wildlife, he said, giving just one example.

By the way, the Maine Audubon plant sale has gone well this year, and although three of the new introductions have sold out, there are still many good native plants in stock.

And he says, and I agree, that September and early October are great times to plant shrubs and perennials in Maine. Plus, buying them will help Audubon staff.

“We don’t want to take care of these plants in the winter,” he said.

Tom Atwell is a freelance writer who gardens in Cape Elizabeth. He can be contacted at: [email protected]

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Finger Lakes Land Trust acquires 4,000 feet of Cayuga Lake shoreline http://birdlifemed.org/finger-lakes-land-trust-acquires-4000-feet-of-cayuga-lake-shoreline/ Wed, 11 Aug 2021 18:30:00 +0000 http://birdlifemed.org/finger-lakes-land-trust-acquires-4000-feet-of-cayuga-lake-shoreline/ It is an annou communityment of the Finger Lakes Land Trust. It was not written by The Ithaca Voice. To submit press releases, email tips@ithacavoice.com. ITHACA, NY — The Finger Lakes Land Trust (FLLT) today announced it has acquired 200 acres with 4,000 feet of shoreline on the east side of Cayuga Lake in the […]]]>

It is an annou communityment of the Finger Lakes Land Trust. It was not written by The Ithaca Voice. To submit press releases, email tips@ithacavoice.com.

ITHACA, NY — The Finger Lakes Land Trust (FLLT) today announced it has acquired 200 acres with 4,000 feet of shoreline on the east side of Cayuga Lake in the town of Lansing, Tompkins County. The conservation of the property, located directly across from Taughannock Falls State Park, preserves an important viewing pool for the area, creates new recreational opportunities and helps protect the water quality of the lake by prohibiting the development on its steep slopes.

The diverse property includes meadows, woods, gorges, waterfalls and panoramic lake views from several locations. Brown pines and red cedars soar above the exposed ledges while a mature hardwood forest covers a prominent ridge overlooking the lake. Several streams and streams cross gorges dotted with hemlock trees towards Cayuga Lake.

The shoreline is part of an important bird area designated by the National Audubon Society and the property contains substantial portions of two unique natural areas designated by the county: Lake Cliffs north of Myers Point and Hidden Glens.

The FLLT plans to establish a public nature reserve on the property for low-impact uses, including hiking, cross-country skiing, and wildlife viewing. The organization also plans to work in partnership with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to restore small wetlands and spring pools, thereby improving wildlife habitat and water quality. It is expected that the property will be officially open to the public in 2023.


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